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Ed

Date Published:

11:41 AM July 22, 2014

Date Updated:

5:20 PM October 1, 2014

in: News
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The national government already declared July 29, 2014 as as Regular Holiday in celebration of Eid’l Fitr or the end of the Holy Month of Ramadan. Malacanang declared the end of Ramadan as a Regular Holiday during an announcement released on July 14, 2014. The Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) also released the official Holiday Pay Rules for the July 29, Holiday.

Eid'l Fitr July 29, 2014

Philippine President Benigno issued Proclamation No. 286, declaring July 29, 2014 as “Eid’l Fitr” holiday, “To promote cultural understanding and integration, the entire Filipino nation should have the full opportunity to join their Muslim brothers and sisters in the observance and acceleration of Eid’l Fitr.” Aquino stated.

Pres. Aquino also noted that Republic Act No. 9177 declared Eid’l Fitr (Feast of Ramadan) as one of the country’s Regular Holiday nationwide.  Aside from the Philippines, millions of Muslims worldwide will celebrate the feast in various corners of the world, most of them living in the Middle East.

Meanwhile the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) reminded all employers in the private sector of the pay rules applicable for the Eid’l Fitr Regular Holiday on July 29, 2014.

Here’s the Pay Rules for July 29, 2014 Eid’l Fitr Regular Holiday:

If the employee did not work, he shall be paid 100 percent of his salary for that day. Computation: (Daily rate + Cost of Living Allowance) x 100 percent. The COLA is included in the computation of holiday pay.

If the employee worked, he shall be paid 200 percent of his regular salary for that day for the first eight hours. Computation: (Daily rate + COLA) x 200 percent. The COLA is also included in computation of holiday pay.

If the employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work), he shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his hourly rate on said day. Computation: Hourly rate of the basic daily wage x 200 percent x 130 percent x number of hours worked.

If the employee worked during a regular holiday that also falls on his rest day, he shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his daily rate of 200 percent. Computation: (Daily rate + COLA) x 200 percent] + (30 percent [Daily rate x 200 percent)].

If the employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work) during a regular holiday that also falls on his rest day, he shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his hourly rate on said day. Computation: (Hourly rate of the basic daily wage x 200 percent x 130 percent x 130 percent x number of hours worked.

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{ 2 comments… add one }
  • jameel July 25, 2014, 1:37 pm

    Hi, I am a muslim . the eid is 28 July not 29 because the eid in Saudi Arabia is 28 so Philippine and Saudi arabia is same date not July u can ask in Saudi . thanks

    • mussaf July 27, 2014, 1:58 pm

      the phil. govt. can move dates of holidays as desired.

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