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1,200-year-old “Coin Bank” With Gold Coins Excavated by Archaeologists

Israeli archaeologists discovered a hoard of seven gold coins dating back to 1,200 years ago, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA).

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Image From: Xinhuanet

According to the Israeli Antiquities Authority, gold coins from the early Islamic period were found in a broken clay juglet during excavations in the city of Yavne in central Israel.

Excavations have emerged in the vast industrial area that has been believed to have been active for several hundred years. According to Israeli archaeologists, the excavated clay juglet is possibly the personal coin bank of a clay pot maker.

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Image From: Xinhuanet

One of the coins was a gold dinar during the reign of Caliph Harun al-Rashid, who reigned between 786-809 AD. In the life of Caliph Harun al-Rashid based on the popular story “Arabian Nights” also known as “One Thousand and One Nights.”

“These gold dinars were issued by the Aghlabid dynasty that ruled in North Africa, in the region of modern Tunisia, on behalf of the Abbasid Caliphate centered in Baghdad,” said by archeologist.

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Image From: Xinhuanet

Lots of pottery kilns or dryer pots have been discovered in extensive excavations. The furnaces are believed to have been used by the end of the Byzantine empire and the early Islamic period.

Pottery kilns were used in commercial production of store jars, cooking pots and cups. Gold coins inside the clay juglet were found near the entrance to the furnaces.

In another part of the excavation site was revealed an extensive winery where grapevines were broken. Many strains were also excavated indicating that the wine production was extensive.

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